Good intentions destroyed in frankenstein

Therefore, over the course of the novel, the monster's main intent was to find a person who would love and accept him without question.

Filled with naive and enthusiastic hubris, Victor is incapable of recognizing, let alone scrutinizing, the implications of his actions. My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment.

The playbill left is from the first London performance in This is also the chapter where Elizabeth Lavenza and Henry Clerval are introduced. The setting in this quote is also important because it helps present a tone that will be very evident later in the novel.

Frankenstein

The creature is also a character whose ambitious actions destroy his good intentions. He is intelligent, eloquent, persuasive and sensitive. We'll occasionally send you account related and promo emails. We also see the proof of the adage that the path to hell is paved with good intentions.

He is also selfish in his loneliness, deciding at first to kidnap the boy William without giving any thought to the effect such a kidnap would have on its victim.

As seen in Frankenstein, what intentions did the monster have throughout the novel?

This shows that Victor is not an entirely malevolent figure. What was my destination. Has this mind, so replete with ideas, imaginations fanciful and magnificent, which formed a world, whose existence depended on the life of its creator;—has this mind perished.

We felt that they were not the tyrants to rule our lot according to their caprice, but the agents and creators of all the many delights which we enjoyed. Both Frankenstein and the creature end up in hell of their own making that can only end in death.

It was supposed to help the world and be an amazing scientific discovery. He promises Frankenstein that he will cease hostilities and go into exile in South America, far away from any place inhabited by man. I will go to the vast wilds of South America. Even with the threat the creature gives Frankenstein, his passion and selfishness for Elizabeth takes control as he marries her, resulting in her death.

Ever since the night of creation, the monster had been neglected and disrespected. He is intelligent, eloquent, persuasive and sensitive.

As seen in Frankenstein, what intentions did the monster have throughout the novel?

One would hope that the magnification will cause society to examine its presumptions, and change. It was something she must have felt only too keenly.

Look at the way he describes his plan for the future: This passage once again creates sympathy for the monster. Victor cannot control the monster because the monster is larger physically and the monster is mentally smarter.

He is aware that giving a child love and happiness as their creator is the best way to ensure they live a fulfilling, joyful life yet he still neglects the monster that he created.

The story is also at heart very human. Check out his " Character Analysis " for more about that. The novel deals with various intriguing themes without getting in the way of a great story, well told.

I was more agile than they and could subsist upon coarser diet; I bore the extremes of heat and cold with less injury to my frame; my stature far exceeded theirs. He promises Frankenstein that he will cease hostilities and go into exile in South America, far away from any place inhabited by man.

As for the creature he asks his creator Frankenstein many a question that us humans ask of god: Check out his description of himself: The way the monster kills people is so brutal that it just tears victor apart.

Being a man of rational thought and scientific inquiry, Victor believes in the ever present optimism in Science. Get an answer for 'How is Victor Frankenstein evil, and how is he good?' and find homework help for other Frankenstein questions at eNotes.

In “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley, good intentions are destroyed by ambitious, selfish, and disrespectful behavior. Frankenstein along with the creature, although seemingly different in personalities, have many characteristics that interlock with each other creating a suspenseful plot filled with good intentions that are never fully executed.

Get an answer for 'As seen in Frankenstein, what intentions did the monster have throughout the novel?' and find homework help for other Frankenstein questions at eNotes.

Good Intentions Destroyed in Frankenstein Essay In “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley, good intentions are destroyed by ambitious, selfish, and disrespectful behavior.

Frankenstein along with the creature, although seemingly different in personalities, have many characteristics that interlock with each other creating a suspenseful plot filled with good intentions that are never fully executed.

“Frankenstein is universally known; & though it can never be a book for vulgar reading, is everywhere respected.”—Sir Walter Scott, Molly Dwyer's award-winning novel on the life of Mary Shelley was released on February 29,one hundred and ninety years after Frankenstein, the debut novel of nineteen-year-old Mary Shelley, was published anonymously (on January 1, ).

Victor has great intentions of what he wants to accomplish, but as he foreshadows, "the words of the fate, renounced to destroy me." With that line, Victor continues his eluding to the horrible consequences to come from his studies and works.

Good intentions destroyed in frankenstein
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As seen in Frankenstein, what intentions did the monster have throughout the novel? | eNotes